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Journal of African Films & Diaspora Studies (JAFDIS)
Published Since: 2018 ISSN 2516-2705 (Print) 2516-2713 (Online)
Publishing Discontinued: The journal is published regularly
Publication Frequency: Bi-annual (Twice a year)

The contributions assembled in this issue, on the development of African film production within the various African Diasporas, survey some of the research published since the 1990s on the subject and offer a glimpse into the multifaceted African cinema. Coming from scholars in different research fields, they present various aspects of the African cinema set at home and in diaspora – its wealth, cultural base, creativity, growing use of electronics and reception, focusing on the global audience being reached by the various types of Nollywood films thanks to a creative marketing and circulation network, supported by diasporan communities and the use of dubbing and subtitling. Ikenna Obumneme Aghanya’s contribution, based on three Igbo-themed movies, seeks to create more awareness on the need for filmmakers, producers, directors and all other stake-holders involved in the making of Igbo–themed Nollywood movies, to take advantage of the new possibilities offered by diasp............

  This is the first issue of The Journal of African Films & Diaspora Studies (JAFDIS), a multi-disciplinary, peer-reviewed, international journal intending to provide a forum for the publication of articles from academics, business practitioners, and policy makers. Publications on African cinema seldom present individual filmmakers, and this is the reason this focus was chosen for the first issue of the journal. The seven filmmakers presented here, through personal interviews and studies of their works, are Lancelot Oduwa Imasuen, Obi Emelonye, Niyi Akinmolayan and Tunde Kelani from Nigeria, representing three different cultures and languages of the country (Edo, Igbo and Yoruba), then Kalosi Ramakhula from Lesotho, David Achkar, a French-Guinean filmmaker, and Raoul Peck from Haiti, whose family spent many years in the Congo. This panoramic view of African cinema, straddling Francophone and Anglophone worlds and considered through the lens of its practitioners, is due t............


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