editor@adonis-abbey.com UK: 0845 873 0262 / Nigeria:+234 705 807 8841

 


SiteLock

Adonis-Abbey's Journal Section

Showing (1 to 7) of 7 editions
Journal of African films and Diaspora Studies (JAFDIS) (Research on African Films, Diaspora Studies, Performance Arts and Communication Studies)
Published Since: 2018. JAFDIS is indexed by IBSS, EBSCO, ProQuest, COPERNICUS and Sabinet.
Publication Frequency: Tri-annual (Three times a year) ISSN: 2516-2705 E-ISSN: 2516-2713

The Journal of African Films & Diaspora Studies (JAFDIS) recognizes the dynamism of society and the forces that drive social change. Some of the drivers of societal change and advancement from certain disciplines have not been given adequate recognition and attention. As a result, the contributions of researchers, academics, policymakers, and practitioners from those areas are under-reported and misreported. The greatest victims of this unhealthy practice appear to be those of Diaspora Studies, Performance and Communication, Arts as well as Films, especially, in the continent of Africa. This Journal was established specifically to address this challenge, and it has been consistent in promoting this cause since its inception. Practitioners, researchers, policymakers, and academics have leveraged the platform provided by this Journal to publish their research outputs, project their contributions and respective disciplines in an unbiased manner, as evident in the Issues of the Journal............

African culture has been projected variously by different scholars. The case of this being willy-nilly misrepresented often by “tainted” accounts from Western perspective has it fair dose in extant literature. The imperative to address this pejorative and present accurate account of the rich African culture and its import is one of the cardinal aims and objectives of this Journal. And the Journal of African Films, Diaspora Studies, Performance Arts and Communication Strategies is a veritable platform for advancing and sustaining this course. Thus, it provides an avenue for African scholars at home and in the Diaspora to project African cultural heritage and its multi-faceted sectoral impact on the society through films, dramas, music, dance, masquerades, carnivals and other forms of communication. The Journal strives to uphold the virtues of African culture, addresses its crisis with Western culture and the impact on Africans as well as African states. In this Issue, answe............

This issue, devoted to varia, offers an array of articles on both subjects covered by this journal, namely African films and Diasporas. It confirms the importance of languages and cultures in people daily lives and illustrates the bond between cinematographic productions and those cultures. It equally confirms the power of the screen and visual arts in attracting attention to challenges facing African nations and denouncing societal evils. From the Mahgreb to Nigeria, Rwanda and Zimbabwe, it also retraces a network of images, beliefs and similarities. Under the title: the fate of Igbo People in Diaspora and the survival of the Igbo Nation: Insights from Igbo Students Association, Delta State University, Abraka, Anyanwu’s article considers the issue of language as it affects both Nigeria and its diaspora, adding to previous publications on the subject. Nigerians’ reluctance to use and promote their national and regional languages has already been stressed. Focusing on Igbo language............

    Editorial Note  Françoise Ugochukwu Open University (UK)       The Nigerian cinema has already been the subject of many publications, treating the many themes treated by that cinema, its locations and impact. This issue of JAFDIS is another first, focusing on individual African films, analysed separately or in a comparative way to assess their impact on viewers and their societies. We wanted to offer scholars a unique opportunity to discover four individual and very different films, representing the various phases of the young, new African cinema from 1998, 2002, 2010 and 2013. These productions emanate from Igboland, Yorubaland and Northern Nigeria respectively - covering the three main culture groups of that vast country - but also from Lesotho, testimonies to various languages and cultures. The six contributors are in post in various countries – Nigeria and Lesotho, Britain and Germany, and come from various academic fields............

The contributions assembled in this issue, on the development of African film production within the various African Diasporas, survey some of the research published since the 1990s on the subject and offer a glimpse into the multifaceted African cinema. Coming from scholars in different research fields, they present various aspects of the African cinema set at home and in diaspora – its wealth, cultural base, creativity, growing use of electronics and reception, focusing on the global audience being reached by the various types of Nollywood films thanks to a creative marketing and circulation network, supported by diasporan communities and the use of dubbing and subtitling. Ikenna Obumneme Aghanya’s contribution, based on three Igbo-themed movies, seeks to create more awareness on the need for filmmakers, producers, directors and all other stake-holders involved in the making of Igbo–themed Nollywood movies, to take advantage of the new possibilities offered by diasp............

  This is the first issue of The Journal of African Films & Diaspora Studies (JAFDIS), a multi-disciplinary, peer-reviewed, international journal intending to provide a forum for the publication of articles from academics, business practitioners, and policy makers. Publications on African cinema seldom present individual filmmakers, and this is the reason this focus was chosen for the first issue of the journal. The seven filmmakers presented here, through personal interviews and studies of their works, are Lancelot Oduwa Imasuen, Obi Emelonye, Niyi Akinmolayan and Tunde Kelani from Nigeria, representing three different cultures and languages of the country (Edo, Igbo and Yoruba), then Kalosi Ramakhula from Lesotho, David Achkar, a French-Guinean filmmaker, and Raoul Peck from Haiti, whose family spent many years in the Congo. This panoramic view of African cinema, straddling Francophone and Anglophone worlds and considered through the lens of its practitioners, is due t............


© Adonis & Abbey Publishers Ltd. All Rights Reserved 2003 - 2021.